How does Old Man Warner feel about giving up the lottery?

How does Old Man Warner respond to talk about giving up the lottery?

Old Man Warner responds to Mr. Adams who tells him that another village had given up the lottery. In Old Man Warner’s eyes, doing away with the lottery would be akin to going back to primitive times. He believes that society would fail without the lottery.

How does Old Man Warner feel about those who would like to change the lottery?

First, Old Man Warner actually believes that the Lottery is good for the town. Twice he calls young people a “pack of fools,” for even considering doing away with the Lottery. Tied to this point, he is a very traditional man. To change tradition is sacrilegious.

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What saying does Old Man Warner quote about the lottery What does this saying suggest about the origin and purpose of the drawing?

When he says “Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon,” his rhymed couplet sounds like an outdated, aphoristic recitation that has lost its meaning in a new age. … What Warner was saying was that because the town was adhering to the tradition of the lottery the town would have good luck in the coming year.

How does Old Man Warner react when Mr Adams tells him that they’re talking of giving up the lottery in a nearby village?

Adams said to Old Man Warner, who stood next to him, “that over in the north village they’re talking of giving up the lottery. Old Man Warner snorted. … There’s always been a lottery,” he added petulantly. “Bad enough to see young Joe Summers up there joking with everybody.”

What does Old Man Warner represent in the story?

In general, Old Man Warner symbolizes the dangers of following tradition without thinking. His blind acceptance of something that people have begun to doubt (other towns have given up the Lottery, and they have not starved) shows how traditional fixation can ignore evidence to the contrary.

What motivates Old Man Warner Why does he think the lottery is a good thing?

The oldest man in the village, Old Man Warner presents the voice of tradition among the villagers. He speaks strongly in favor of continuing the lottery, because he claims that to end it would be to return society to a primitive state, permitting all sorts of other problems to arise.

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What does Old Man Warner mean with this line lottery in June corn be heavy soon?

He recalls a time when the lottery was a reminder of when the crops would be coming up — “Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon”. This means that when the lottery came around in June, it would not be long before their corn would start sprouting.

What saying does Old Man Warner recite about the lottery in paragraph 32 of the lottery?

Old Man Warner’s dialogue in the following passage (paragraph 32) mainly suggests … Used to be a saying about ‘Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon. ‘ First thing you know, we’d all be eating stewed chickweed and acorns. There’s always been a lottery,” he added petulantly.

What does Old Man Warner most likely represent?

In “The Lottery” (1948), Old Man Warner symbolizes tradition and blind faith.